Conference Session Details

2017 MOTA ANNUAL CONFERENCE
RECLAIMING OCCUPATION THROUGH
EVIDENCE AND INNOVATION
NOVEMBER 10-11, 2017

 

Full Session Details

TRACKS:

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ACADEMICS MENTAL HEALTH PEDIATRICS PHYSICAL DISABILITIES STUDENTS

  

 

Friday Selections

1:00PM - 4:00PM

  AA Fieldwork Education: What It Is and How To Do It (effectively)

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  As an OT, you participated in fieldwork during your formal OT training. Now, with some experience under your belt you are interested in working with students and supporting them in their education and entry into OT practice. This session will focus on several aspects of student supervision both for those new to working with fieldwork students and for those that have worked with students. Collaboratively presented content will combine both academic and clinical perspectives and information. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the basics of the OT Practice Framework, the AOTA Occupational Profile Template, and OT Accreditation Standards
  • Identify available resources and opportunities for development of a fieldwork program and skills as an individual fieldwork educator
  • Identify teaching and learning styles and how differences in both can create opportunities and challenges in the fieldwork education relationship
  • Participate in brain storming and problem solving around challenging situations, and managing competing demands on your time as a fieldwork educator.

 Presenters: Chris Bourland MHA, OTR/L and Kirsten Prouty MS, OTR/L

 

  BB Guided Motor Imagery and the Treatment of Complex Pain

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This course will cover graded motor imagery (GMI) for treating complicated pain, including central sensitization, what to look for in your evaluation, and how to know which patients would benefit most. The use of GMI including pain neuroscience education, left right discrimination, visualization, sensory retraining, and mirror therapy will be described and practiced in a hands on lab. Time will be spent applying GMI to diagnoses including CRPS, phantom limb pain, “frozen shoulder”, LBP and more. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the background of graded motor imagery (GMI) in practice, indications for clinical use, and how it fits into a comprehensive pain treatment plan.
  • Verbalize a basic understanding of the role of pain neuroscience education and methods and resources for implementation.
  • Verbalize awareness of the core stages of GMI including rationale and clinical applications.
  • Demonstrate through hands on lab basic skills and tools involved in implementation in the clinic.
  • Identify ways to modify intervention to meet a variety of common complex pain conditions for both outpatient and inpatient settings.

Presenters: Lindsay Marth MA, OTR/L, TPS and Rebecca Vogsland DPT, OCS, CMTPT, CSMT, TPS

 

  CC A Multi-Directional Approach to Feeding:  Pediatrics  

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This presentation will include everyday useful techniques to help navigate one of the most complex sensorimotor and social experiences that children will encounter daily: feeding. This workshop will focus on oral motor function, sensory experiences, shaping behaviors, establishing routines, and mealtime methods to help support the children you work with. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to: 

  • Gain knowledge of potential issues interfering with a child's food consumption through hands on experiences. 
  • Learn how to modify your approach and the language you use to provide a positive feeding environment to shape the child's behavior. 
  • Obtain practical tips to assist families with structure and routine during meals in their home and in the clinic. 

Presenters: Krista Judge MA, OTR/L and Jami Eilers COTA/L

 

  DD Post Intensive Care Syndrome, Delirium and Cognition

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  With increased prevalence of symptoms following an ICU stay, more patients are being diagnosed with post-intensive care syndrome. Occupational Therapists are uniquely suited to assist with prevention and management of post-intensive care syndrome due to the holistic and occupation-based nature of the profession. In addition, recent research has found increasing incidence of long-term cognitive deficits following critical illness.  This course will inform attendees about risk factors, symptoms, prevention and treatment of post-intensive care syndrome and discuss cognitive assessment/screening tools, interventions, and delirium as they relate to the intensive care unit population. This course will inform attendees about risk factors, symptoms, and treatments of PICS and delirium/cognitive deficits in a critically ill population.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define post-intensive care syndrome and describe common signs and symptoms
  • List risk factors of developing PICS and describe the potential long-term effects of PICS
  • Describe potential roles an occupational therapist can have in preventing/treating PICS
  • Describe common signs and symptoms of delirium/cognitive deficits in the intensive care unit
  • List and describe cognitive assessments/screening tools and interventions for use in the intensive care unit
  • Identify appropriate use of activity/distraction aprons within the intensive care unit

Presenters: Emily Bodensteiner, MOT, OTR/L and Kristin Hall, MBA, MS, OTR/L

 

  EE Orthosis Fabrication Review for the Assiduous Occupational Therapist

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This session will teach OTs how to fabricate orthoses that are most commonly seen in many different treatment areas.  We will practice using different types of splinting material, and learns tips and tricks to make orthotic fabrication successful.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Fabricate at least 4 orthoses: resting hand, wrist cock-up, forearm based thumb spica, hand based thumb spica.
  • Identify anatomical considerations of the hand related to orthotic fabrication.
  • Identify mechanical principles of immobilization orthoses.
  • Identify precautions for immobilization orthoses.
  • Recommend clinical applications for each orthosis fabricated.
  • Identify the wearing schedule and methods of care for each of the orthoses fabricated.
  • Identify soft tissue considerations specific to immobilization orthoses.
  • Demonstrate correct uses of padding and strapping for each orthosis fabricated.

Presenter: Alice Snorteland, MBA, OTR/L, CHT

 

  FF Visual Disturbances in Neurological Conditions: Assessment and Treatment

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The possibility exists that visual disturbances may occur with a variety of neurological conditions. It is important for occupational therapists to understand how to accurately assess and treat a variety of visual problems, as vision is a primary sense used to interpret our environment. This session will focus on understanding symptoms, how to screen for potential problems, treatment options available, and functional implications it may have on activities of daily living.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify symptoms that indicate a potential vision problem.
  • Identify the differences amongst the variety of vision problems that can occur following a neurological event and how it impacts functional performance with ADL/IADLs.
  • Identify how to screen for potential vision problems including visual processing and visual perception.  
  • Identify therapeutic approaches used to treat vision problems.

Presenters: Stephanie Freadrich MS, OTR/L and Abbey Rolf MA, OTR/L

 

Saturday Keynote Address - 8:00AM - 9:00AM

  Keynote address The Power of Occupation: Energizing Your Passion

Target Audience:  OT, OTA

Content Level:  Introductory/Intermediate

Keynote Description:  The World needs occupational therapy now more than ever! We are part of the only profession that helps people, across the lifespan, participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. We understand the true nature of adaption – something that is desperately needed in today’s challenging society. The World needs OT right now . . . so as we celebrate our Centennial, let’s re-energize our passion for "occupation" and embrace our future!

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

Presenter:  Denise Chisholm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA  

 

Saturday Selections By Time:

9:10AM - 11:10AM

  1A Motivational Interviewing in Healthcare

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Motivational Interviewing is a style of collaborative conversation that helps patients explore and resolve their ambivalence about health and behavior change. In over 300 clinical trials, MI has proven to improve patient appointment attendance, satisfaction and outcomes. This course will review the Spirit of MI, Foundation Principles, and Patient-Centered listening skills with practical application to your work and patients.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify basic principles of Motivational Interviewing (MI).
  • Practice unconditional, positive regard for patients.
  • Incorporate the fundamentals of MI – “MI Spirit” –into each patient encounter.
  • Recognize the role of MI’s Foundational Principles in health and behavior change.
  • Apply basic patient-centered listening strategies to overcome patient barriers to change.
  • Recognize ambivalence and respond in an MI adherent manner.
  • Provide information and advice in an MI adherent manner.

Presenter: Christy Dauner, OTR

 

  1B The Technology Enhanced Curriculum-Examples from OT Education

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Use of technology in occupational therapy education has been expanding rapidly in recent years, yet many clinical educators who have been educated in a different era question how such a hands on profession like OT can be taught with technology. The goal of this presentation is to demonstrate a variety of ways technology is enhancing OT and OTA education, from interactive online learning activities to entire curriculums delivered in a hybrid approach to educational electronic medical records created for learning documentation.  Participants will also learn how education programs decide what kinds of learning objectives are best suited for delivery in online and technology-enhanced settings.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the difference between online, hybrid and face-to-face curriculums.
  • Identify learning objectives best suited for online and technology approaches.
  • Describe innovative examples of technology currently used to teach OT and OTA students

Presenter:  Terrianne Jones, PhD, OTR/L and Andrea Harrison, MS, OTR/L

 

  1C L.E.G.A.C.Y. Appreciative Life Review: An Emerging Model to Support Occupation-Based Practice in Mental Health

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Meaningful occupational narratives drive the development of purpose and support occupational engagement, performance, and satisfaction. This workshop will present L.E.G.A.C.Y.™: An Appreciative Life Review Model, a framework and process to create meaningful occupational narratives which facilitate being, doing, becoming, and belonging with clients. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to: 

  • Identify and explain the theoretical foundations of the L.E.G.A.C.Y.™ Appreciative Life Review Model.
  • Describe and discuss the role, benefits and application of the L.E.G.A.C.Y.™ Appreciative Life Review Model in contemporary occupational therapy practice.
  • Demonstrate how the Model facilitates the creation of meaningful occupational narratives to support occupational engagement, performance and satisfaction with a case study of a client in a mid-life transition.

Presenters: Nicole O Hansen MS, MOT, OTR/L, CHWC, GCDF

 

  1D Surviving the NICU: The Role of Occupation in the NICU and Beyond

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description: During this session, we will discuss the latest medical advances within the NICU setting and their affects on the ability for the infant to obtain the occupations of feeding and motor development. Understanding the medical co-morbidities associated with prematurity and the congenital birth defects that affect these infants, will empower the occupational therapy clinician to create more individualized treatment planning for the infant after discharge home from the NICU. During this presentation, we will discuss the latest interventions to support feeding/development within the NICU setting; provide a systematic approach to clinical reasoning with complex premature infants; and discuss medically fragile term infants with cardiac and congenital anomalies. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the theoretical concept of Developmental Care and its integration in the NICU
  • Identify medical co-morbidities associated with prematurity and the affects on age appropriate occupations
  • Discuss medical management for the term newborn with congenital birth defects
  • Identify treatment interventions utilized within the NICU by occupational therapists to maximize feeding and motor development
  • Discuss the importance for early intervention with high-risk newborns

Presenters: Holly Schifsky OTR/L, NTMTC, CBIS, CNT 

 

  1E Why is Neuroplasticity Important to Occupational Therapy Practitioners?

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   The concept of neuroplasticity has influenced therapeutic interventions for the past 2 decades, yet there are still those who question the relevance of neuroplasticity to occupational therapy practice. So this presentation will review the evidence relating to neuroplasticity within the brain that are pertinent to the practice of occupational therapy.  Developmental, functional, post-lesion, and healthy aging evidence and application of neuroplasticity will be presented.  The developmental disorders of cerebral palsy, autism, sensory/learning disabilities, central nervous system injury in adults, and healthy aging are very different from one another - yet in all cases the neurons of the brain exhibit plasticity, i.e. they have the capacity to change their structure, function, and connections according to the inputs generated by activity and learning.   Prenatal and postnatal changes resulting in the organization of the nervous system circuitry are referred to as ‘developmental plasticity’.   Brain plasticity is an intrinsic process that occurs through the life span allowing an individual to adapt to changing environments by strengthening, weakening, pruning or adding synaptic connections, and by neurogenesis.  Furthermore, plasticity can be positive (adaptive) or negative (maladaptive).  When there is a traumatic injury the brain is forced to rewire itself - this is the key to functional recovery and also the basis of many aspects of motor dysfunction e.g. spasticity and synergistic movements.  The brain also defines a person’s ability to adapt despite trauma, tragedy or adversity while maintaining the ability to thrive within their environment (i.e., resiliency).  Therefore, it is imperative that we, practitioners, understand the impact of plasticity-based therapeutic tools in health, disease, and during recovery. 

This presentation will review the evidence relating to neuroplasticity that are pertinent to the practice of occupational therapy.  More specifically:  (1) the nature of the structural abnormalities associated with adaptive and maladaptive plasticity identified through neuroimaging will be described; (2) how these atypical structural features correspond to observable behavior will be discussed; (3) research findings of training-induced plasticity will be explored; and (4) tools to translate research findings to inform the development of therapeutic strategies that promote functional recovery will be recommended.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the major mechanisms of brain plasticity associated with development and, memory and learning.
  • Describe adaptive and maladaptive brain plasticity features identified via neuroimaging. 
  • Explain evidence based therapeutic strategies for creating positive brain changes.

Presenters: Meenakshi Iyer, PhD., OTR/L

 

  1F Occupation and Clinical Outcomes Using Strategic Friction Reduction

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Clinical management of shear stresses and friction are currently highlighted nationally and internationally. Many OTs, however, are not actively addressing this critical area, and some OTs do not realize the relevance in their practice area. Friction and shear reduction have significant implications in many settings: It is critical with fragile skin conditions including epidermolysis bullosa and burns, use of orthotics, or other medical equipment, SNF settings, hospice, sports/athletics/high performance settings, rehab, and seating and wheeled mobility. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) updated the definition of pressure injury in 2016, and specifically included shear and friction as components of a pressure injury.  There is increased focus on the significant and complex relationships between all the intrinsic factors.  Pressure and shear are closely linked, friction has a role in the development of shear, and microclimate influences the susceptibility of skin and soft tissues to the effects of pressure, shear, and friction. Strategic friction reduction provides a significant factor in primary prevention, in healing, and in secondary prevention of occurrence, allowing for maximal clinical outcomes.  This presentation provides education regarding a review of the research on the implications of shear stress on the body, including tissue distortion and effects on blood vessels. Clinical management of shear stresses and friction will be included: Identification of those at risk for shear and friction injuries, decreasing tangential forces, avoiding tissue distortion, increasing contact area with support surfaces, and strategic use of lower co-efficient of friction interfaces.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain clinical relevance why OTs need to be involved with friction and shear reduction in their setting
  • Associate the damaging effects of friction/shear on the human body in both dynamic and static loading contexts and explain why this is so
  • Identify OT role with innovative applications of low co-efficient of friction interfaces
  • Describe at least three research-based clinical management strategies for controlling friction between the weight bearing surface and a patient and describe how doing so will reduce shear loads against the skin and deep tissue

Presenters: Caroline Portoghese, OTR/L, ATP/SMS, MSCS, LNHA, MBA

 

  1G The Confidence and Competence to Address the IADL of Driving and Community Mobility: “What can I say” and “Am I qualified to say it?” 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   A barrier to addressing driving and community mobility is the lack of confidence and competence related to “What can I say” and “Am I qualified to say it?”.  Throughout the work of AOTA’s Older Driver Initiative we have come to appreciate that even experienced practitioners are often hesitant to comment on the IADL of driving let alone suggest driving cessation, even in situations where recommendations for restricting IADLs of lesser complexity are readily offered such as requiring supervision when going to stores or restriction from using kitchen appliances.  Unfortunately too may skilled practitioners may confuse addressing the IADL of driving and community mobility with the specific need for the expert services of the driving rehabilitation specialist.  This confusion is unfortunate as too many patients are left “hanging”, uninformed and unsure.  The consequence is that far too few are offered a context to make decisions or ever referred to driving rehabilitation services.  Avoiding this IADL is not positive for OTs or the patients we serve. Take a step back and think about how you apply activity analysis to other ADLs and IADLs.  Practitioners do not need to be an expert chef to conduct a kitchen evaluation.  OTs focus is the analysis of a patients approach and execution, not geared to measure their “cooking” expertise.  This reasoning absolutely applies to the complex task of driving.  Occupational therapy practitioners can competently make recommendations about the complex IADL of driving and community mobility, understanding that a recommendation may rightly include “need more information from a comprehensive driving evaluation.”  This session will provide education to enhance practitioner confidence to address Driving and Community within your setting, within your scope of practice. Resources will be offered to develop a pathway of services and opportunities for clients.  No one can address driving and community needs in isolation.  Each provider has a role, even the role of identifying a concern or “risk” and referring to a driving rehabilitation program “at the right time” is essential to the health and safety of our clients.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Attendees will receive and learn how to use a Toolkit of resources including:1) The Clinicians Guide to Assessment and Counseling Older Drivers which includes a screening tool and decision tree  2) The Spectrum of Decision Indicators for Driving and Community Mobility designed to support treatment planning and recommendations by determining risk factors based on evidence obtained through observation of performance, 3) how to start the conversations incorporating resources “We Need to Talk” and “At The Crossroads” for patients with dementias. 

Presenters:   Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, FAOTA

 

  1H Impact of UE Functional Electrical Stimulation for Neurorehabilitation and Enhanced Functional Outcomes

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Functional electrical stimulation (FES) combined with traditional Occupational Therapy interventions have been clinically proven to produce greater improvements in UE function, self-care abilities and UE motor control when compared to the intervention alone. This instructional session will discuss how utilization of FES for massed practice, activity based therapies can increase patient outcomes in your neuro-restorative rehabilitation programs. The session will outline the research supporting use of FES to promote neuro-recovery and enhance functional outcomes, as well as a few case studies. A short lab utilizing the Restorative Therapies Xcite FES Clinical Station with hands-on experience applying FES to review how to optimize UE stimulation parameters including electrode placement suggestions to achieve desired movement patterns will follow. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review case studies to expand clinical applications of FES assisted activity based therapies.
  • Review research supporting FES activity based therapies to enhance patient outcomes.
  • Identify the fundamentals of FES to optimize stimulation parameters to impact patient performance.

Presenters: Jan Dobbs, OTR

 

  1I Exploring Practice Settings and OTR and COTA Collaboration

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This seminar is open to MOT and OTA students and/or occupational therapy professionals wanting to gain a deeper understanding about the teamwork and role differences between OTRs and COTAs along with various setting available for the occupational therapy field.  The session will be 2 hours in length and consist of a panel of various OTRs and COTAs from different settings. The panelists will share their personal experiences on how they work together as a team at their setting to provide therapy to their clients.  Topics discussed will include how OTRs and COTAs collaborate in various settings, supervision of COTAs by OTRs, and the types of responsibilities OTRs and COTAs are able to take on.  Topics will also include examples of various practice settings which occupational therapy offers services, along with how to identify current emerging practice settings.  Seminar attendees will be able to ask questions of the panel.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Strengthen their understanding of how OTRs and COTAs collaborate in a variety of settings.
  • Explore the various traditional, non-traditional, and emerging practice settings for the occupational therapy field.
  • Reinforce understanding of the role differences between OTRs and COTAs in various settings.

Presenters:   Katherine Sherrard, OTS and Rebecca Anderson, OTR/L, MSCS

 

1:55PM - 3:55PM

  2A How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going? Healthcare Reform 2017

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This session seeks to inform members about the potential impacts of healthcare reform efforts on occupational therapy practice. We will discuss national and state reform efforts including coding and reimbursement, as well as policy trends for the future and how the legislative process works. In addition, we will describe how MOTA’s legislative priorities are established, and MOTA’s role in influencing and monitoring state agency policies. 

 Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the implication for occupational therapy practice in MN of various healthcare reform efforts including changes to coding and reimbursement.
  • Describe the legislative process.
  • Describe how MOTA sets its legislative priorities
  • Describe MOTA’s role in influencing state agency regulations.

Presenters: Karen M Sames, OTD, MBA, OTR/L, FAOTA,  Andrea Horvath, MAOT, OTR/L, Cathy Brennan, MA, OTR/L, FAOTA and Cory Bennett, MOTA Lobbyist

 

  2B Fieldwork Issues

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Today’s occupational therapy students are tomorrow’s practice. Fieldwork is the bridge between academics and entering the work force. Supervisors strive to bring out the best in the students while meeting position expectations. In this session we will address guidelines and policies related to student supervision and strategies for effectiveness including the collaborative model. A salon group method will also be used to stimulate problem solving and innovation for fieldwork programming. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe supervision policies for OT and OTA Level I and Level II fieldwork students in various practice settings
  • Learn various collaborative models to incorporate into their fieldwork program
  • Participate in stimulating discussion for innovative fieldwork

Presenters: Linda Buxell, MA, OTR/L

 

  2C Let’s Talk About It- A Mental Health Salon sponsored by OT for the Advancement of Minnesota Mental Health Services

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Socratic Salons are group conversations around a topic of interest. They typically last about 3 hours and start with a “check in question” followed by a simple meal and free flowing discussion, then close with a final “check in”. Salons have been used by other health professions such as nursing to promote reflective practice (Petty, 2010) and there is evidence that the founders of OT engaged in similar conversations as they envisioned a new profession. This session will give participants a taste of the salon experience in a 2 hour format, complete with treats!

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Socratic Salon process as a means for facilitating powerful and engaging discussions
  • Understand the impact of the Socratic Salon process in promoting occupational therapy as a member of the inter-professional mental health team

Presenters: Terrianne Jones, PhD, OTR/L and Kary Gilenwaters, MA, OTR/L

 

  2D The PEARL: An Occupation-Based Social Skills Manual for Children with an Emotional-Behavioral Disorders 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The PEARL (Program for the Development of Self-Esteem, Self-Awareness, Self-Advocacy, Self-Regulation and Life Skills) is an occupation-based social skills program that grew out of my capstone project for my doctorate in occupational therapy.  It was created out of a need for an alternative approach when teaching social skills to children with an emotional or behavioral disorder (EBD) or mental illness in the school setting. The focus will be on evidence-based research supporting an occupation-based approach to teaching social skills in a school-based setting.  Research also concentrates on OTs having the skills to instruct a group on social skill development.  Child mental health is an emerging niche for occupational therapists (OTs), according to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA).  The AOTA’s Vision 2025 is discussed and woven into the overall evidence-based research on how OTs can teach social skills to children with an EBD or mental illness.  Participants will learn how childhood stress, anxiety, relationship building, and trauma affect the lives and behavior of students.  The focus is on the importance of using an occupation-based approach rather cognitive approach to teach social skills.  Occupational therapist have the skills and knowledge to teach social skills in a group setting.  The PEARL curriculum, including strategies and activities, will be discussed and examples given.  Currently, the PEARL manual is not published but publishing is being pursued.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe an occupational therapist’s role in teaching social skills in a school-based setting.
  • Identify barriers students may experience which affect their behavior in a school setting.
  • Understand how evidence-based research supports occupation-based social skills intervention.
  • Discuss how The PEARL social skills manual can affect social skill building for children with an Emotional Behavioral Disorder.

Presenters: Gina Rainelli OTD, OTR/L

 

  2E Exploring the Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT): An Alternative Cognitive Assessment

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Occupational therapists are responsible for assessing functional cognition and making recommendations for safe discharge plans and crossing the continuum of care. One assessment tool is the Executive Function Performance Tests (EFPT). The EFPT was developed by Baum, Morrison, Hahn & Edwards in 2003 at the Occupational Therapy Program at Washington University Medical School. The assessment examines executive functioning in the context of a 4 functional tasks. In this presentation, we will provide instruction on purpose of this assessment, intended audience and educate on the scoring and show examples of its use. This assessment can serve as additional resource for occupational therapists in acute care, inpatient rehab, outpatient and home health care. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the purpose and intended audience for use of this measure.
  • Define the standardization and scoring of the EFPT.
  • Recognize the evidence and research behind the use of the EFPT.
  • Provide resources for implementing the assessment in your clinic.
  • Build on your occupational therapy tool box of assessments to better evaluate cognition deficits in patients with neurological deficits.

Presenters: Katelyn Brady OTR/L, OTD

 

 

  2F Addressing Chronic Pain across Occupational Therapy Settings

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   We will be discussing OT and chronic pain by addressing the biopsychosocial model, importance of using correct language related to pain with clients and advocating for occupational therapists within multiple settings (inpatient, outpatient, acute, hand therapy, pediatrics, skilled nursing home) to address chronic pain. The presentation will include discussion on evidence based interventions that can be used in these settings versus only in pain rehabilitation programs.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain pain multi contextually from a physical, psychosocial, physiological, and occupational perspective.
  • Describe a variety of standardized assessments and evidence-based treatment interventions currently being used with people with chronic pain.
  • Identify the role of occupational therapy with chronic pain in a variety of settings and identify differences in care approaches by practice setting.
  • Address the significance of the vocabulary and words clinicians and the general public use surrounding chronic pain and the impact that has on outcomes. 
  • Identify ways to advocate or occupational therapy’s inclusion into current or developing pain management programs.

Presenters:   Karen Carr, OTR/L; Kaisa Syvaoja, OTD, OTR/L; Clarissa Mireau, MA, OTR/L, TPS

 

  2G OT Research: We got this!

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This 2 hour session will explore how OT practitioners can pragmatically support clinical research (i.e., in a manner that will not interfere with productivity demands) and how to connect to local OT researchers to support them in doing such. In this session, we will explore: the importance of conveying the unique value of OT through research outcomes, how to frame a research question and work with OT researchers to answer it, things to consider when delivering and measuring the impact of OT interventions, and examples of different ways we are doing this locally. Practicing OTs can help contribute to science of OT and help to make known the impact and unique value of OT! Local OT researchers have the tools to help make this happen! We got this!    

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Appreciate the need and impact of studying our outcomes
  • Frame a research question in PICO format
  • Possess the resources necessary to outreach to local OT researchers to support you in answering your question in a way that affords the greatest confidence and application of your findings
  • Understand the importance of using outcome measures with good psychometrics
  • Appreciate the importance of standardized selection and reporting of outcomes and protocolization of intervention approach
  • Be aware of local academic-practitioner research partnerships, partner roles/responsibilities, and the pragmatics of these studies 
  • Be empowered to pursue answering and seek support to answer practice questions

Presenters:   Cory McGee PhD, MS, OTR/L, CHT

 

  2H Dysphagia Basics that Every OT Should Know

 Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   The swallowing process is commonly affected by the normal aging process, impacting a growing number of individuals older than 60 years (National Foundation of Swallowing Disorders, 2013). It is estimated that 40-50% of older individuals residing in long-term care facilities have swallowing disorders (Easterling and Robbins, 2008) and over 30% of the non-institutionalized older adults have a history of swallowing problems (Roy, Stemple, Merrill and  Thomas, 2007).  Aspiration risk has been determined in up to 80% of patients with stroke and over half the population has been cited to have silent aspiration.  Patients with MS have incidences of dysphagia over 30% of the time and over half of the population with Parkinson’s has dysphagia.   (Altman, Yu, and Schaefer, S. D., 2010 and Falsetti et al., 2009).  Given these populations, diagnoses and society’s overall relationship with food as a social activity, occupational therapists are at the forefront of understanding how to best serve individuals who suffer with dysphagia.  We, as occupational therapists, fully understand the impact of the physiological, basic need for nutrition but also the larger psychological, social and motivational impact as well.  The occupation of tending to this self-care need can span all settings: rehab facilities, inpatient/outpatient settings, homecare from pediatrics to adults.  The purpose of this talk is to gain awareness of this specialty practice and gain some knowledge that all occupational therapists should have in their tool boxes.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the definition of dysphagia, basic anatomy involved with the swallow process and recognize the phases of a normal swallow
  • Recognize risk factors and clinical signs of dysphagia/aspiration
  • Be familiar with diagnostic assessments associated with dysphagia and what the results indicate
  • Be aware of dysphagia interventions including exercises, compensatory techniques, use of adaptive equipment for feeding and use of the Free Water Guidelines
  • Be aware of good oral care practices as it relates to dysphagia
  • Recognize diet modifications, The National Dysphagia Diet
  • Be aware of members of the multidisciplinary dysphagia team
  • Recognize quality of life concerns as it relates to dysphagia
  • Review correct documentation, appropriate goals and billing/coding process for dysphagia/feeding interventions.
  • Understand when to refer and who to refer to

Presenters:   Janelle Hatlevig, MA, OTR/L, BCPR and Shari Bernard, OTD, SCFES

 

  2I Evaluating Job Offers and Presenting Yourself Professionally in the Workplace

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This MOTA session will consist of information aimed at soon to be occupational therapy graduates and those already in the workplace looking to learn how to effectively evaluate job offers and learn more about professionalism in the workplace.  This valuable session will help weigh the pros and cons of a job offer and areas to really look for to fit your personal and professional need to allow for growth as a professional in the occupational therapy field.  Professionalism will also be addressed during this 2 hour session regarding how to present yourself professionally in a work setting and important documents to have polished for job interviews.  This session presents valuable information that is oftentimes overlooked by many in the field.  There will be time for questions and answers and opportunities to network.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Gain information about how to evaluate job offers.  
  • Learn about benefits (mentorship, insurance, CE credits, student loans, etc.) to look for in a position of interest. 
  • Acquire knowledge about the job search process, how to sell yourself, and areas to focus on professionally, including resumes and cover letters.
  • Gain practical skills and tips for attending interviews.

Presenters:   Ericka Niemann, OTS;  Brittany McPhail, OTS

 

 4:00PM - 5:00PM

  3A   Legislative Update 2017

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This session seeks to inform members about changes in legislation at the state level. The presenters will discuss activities taking place related to the creation of a Board of Occupational Therapy Practitioners in MN as well as MOTA’s role surrounding legislation. The session includes opportunities for questions and answers from the audience 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe difference between being licensed by the MN Department of Health and by the Board of Occupational Therapy Practice.
  • Describe the importance of the role of MOTA members in influencing legislation.
  • Increase awareness of current issues affecting occupational therapy practice in Minnesota.

Presenters: Karen M Sames, OTD, MBA, OTR/L, FAOTA and Andrea Horvath, MAOT, OTR/L

 

  3B Group Model Level 1 Fieldwork in Community Based Non-traditional Settings for OTA Online Students

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This presentation discusses the barriers in placing OTA students in a traditional model level I Fieldwork, the development and implementation of a group model, and the learning outcomes identified by students and educators from student outcomes evaluations and surveys. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the identified barriers in level I placement for OT.
  • Identify the benefits and strategies to overcome barriers of level I FW in group model, specifically 4+ students to 1 fieldwork educator, in a non-traditional community based setting.
  • Describe the outcomes that this program has had with level I fieldwork as an intensive three day group model.

Presenter: Melissa Jazmines-Broersma, MS, OTD, OTR/L and Thomas Hutton, MA, OTR/L

 

  3C OT and Mental Health-Treating the Whole Person: A Panel

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  A panel discussion about how occupational therapy can, and should be a part of the recovery process for people who struggle with their mental health today, and in the future.  The women on this panel are working in different occupational therapy settings, but all are focused on treating the whole person, with special attention to mental health.  All of them are working to increase the visibility of OT in mental health as well as conquer the special challenges that OT faces with reimbursement for mental health occupational therapy treatment through participation in various networking groups, through communicating with different providers to increase knowledge of OTs role in mental health and through changing the practice areas in which they treat clients with mental illness.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 3 reasons that occupational therapists are an integral part of the recovery process for clients struggling with mental health issues.
  • Describe 2 ways to increase the visibility of Occupational Therapy in mental health.
  • List 2 challenges that Occupational Therapists face with reimbursement for OT services in mental health setting.

Presenters: Jacqueline Wagner, MA, OTR/L, Jessica Engman, OTR/L and Brittany Hubbard, MA, OTR/L

 

  3D OT and Eating Disorders

Target Audience:  OT, OTA

Content Level:  Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  OT plays unique role at Melrose, aiming to change thought processes and ineffective behaviors that contribute to/support the eating disorder.  OT assists patients with establishing a life that supports recovery so that life takes the wheel and ED takes back seat. We apply skills from all disciplines to real life experiences by re-involving patients in a life engaged in meaningful and productive activities.  We educate patients on healthy and effective coping skills, assist with goal setting to increase self esteem and confidence, explore self-identity without the eating disorder, clarify role performance, and aim to improve social and life skills. In addition, we assist patients with problem solving what has not been effective in daily life and work together to find ways to improve functional performance by identifying strategies to manage anxiety in challenging situations.  OT is also qualified to administer assessments that gather data regarding a patient’s cognitive performance, life skills, safety, and occupational performance level. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify evidenced based practice most appropriate in the treatment of eating disorders.
  • Explain the role of OT in the treatment of eating disorders.
  • Explain therapeutic value of 3 OT interventions used in the treatment of eating disorders.
  • Understand the relationship of co-occurring diagnoses associated with eating disorders.

Presenter(s): Ken Reimann, OTR/L; Melissa Livingston, OTR/L; Kayla Hampton, OTR/L; Erin Coffey, OTR/L; Kisha Patterson, OTR/L and Samantha Thayer, OTR/L

 

  3E Occupational Therapy’s Role in Montessori Preschools: Sleep and Interprofessional Teamwork 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This presentation will discuss the role of sleep in development of preschool children and Occupational Therapy’s role in addressing sleep with the population of at-risk preschoolers in a Montessori environment. Occupational therapists bring a unique holistic and family-centered view of the IADL of sleep that is often overlooked by other health professionals. Occupational therapists understand the impact of the environment on a child’s development and understand how a family’s routines, rituals and roles shape the health of a child. Research suggests at-risk children are at a greater disadvantage for problems and for sleep disturbances. Sleep is especially important during the preschool years as it impacts physical and psychological development as well as school-readiness.

Project activities involved a review of pertinent literature, needs assessment, implementation of interdisciplinary early childhood screenings, family enrichment sessions on sleep, and interprofessional resource development related to language and self-regulation skills in preschoolers. Details on the project activities and project outcomes will be shared in addition to implications for Occupational Therapy practitioners addressing sleep in preschoolers and practitioners working in non-traditional setting such as the Montessori environment.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to articulate the role of occupational therapy in addressing sleep concerns with children and families.
  • Identify ways in which occupational therapy can support children and families in non-traditional community-based settings such as the Montessori environment and identify the profession’s role within interdisciplinary teams.

Presenters: Alycia Parrish, OTS; Maria Davis, OTS; Eunjung An, OTS; Sarah Janus, OTS; Heather Northey, OTS; Rebecca Patterson, OTS; Anna Hepokoski, OTS and  Meghan Tholen, OTS, OTD, OTR/L

 

  3F Adoption and Sensory Processing 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This presentation will provide information related to adoption, both international and domestic. It will describe sensory deprivation and the impact it has on a child’s development along with the effects of early adversity. The impact of deprivation and early adversity can affect a child as they age and into adulthood; strategies for management of sensory processing skills through the life span will be provided.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Attendees will be able to identify how early adversity and sensory deprivation affect sensory processing and development skills.
  • Attendees will identify three strategies for management of sensory processing challenges

Presenters:  Megan Bresnahan, OTR/L

 

 

  3G OT Panel Discussion: Innovative Strategic Friction Reduction in Different Settings 

Target Audience:  OT/OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Clinical management of shear stresses and friction are currently highlighted nationally and internationally. Many OTs, however, are not actively addressing this critical area, and some OTs do not realize the relevance in their practice area. Friction and shear reduction have significant implications in many settings: It is critical with fragile skin conditions including epidermolysis bullosa and burns, use of orthotics, or other medical equipment, SNF settings, hospice, sports/athletics/high performance settings, rehab, and seating and wheeled mobility.  This presentation provides an overview of the relevance of friction and shear reduction for occupational therapy, and offers perspectives from different therapists in multiple different settings regarding successful and innovative clinical strategies.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain clinical relevance why OTs need to be involved with friction and shear reduction
  • Identify OT role with innovative applications of low co-efficient of friction interfaces in at least 3 different settings
  • Describe at least one method for clinical management of friction and shear forces in their current practice setting.

Presenters: Caroline Portoghese, OTR/L, ATP/SMS, MSCS, LNHA, MBA

 

 

  3H Participation and Quality of Life for Persons with Oculomotor Impairments after Acquired Brain Injury

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The purpose of this project was to explore the prevalence and nature of participation and quality of life for persons with ABI-related oculomotor impairments. The specific aims were to (1) describe participation in everyday activities and social roles, and quality of life; and (2) provide preliminary recommendations for occupational therapists and health care providers on which specific participation areas to assess and identify possible tools to use.  This study used a cross sectional descriptive approach with self-report tools to measure visual symptoms, quality of life, and participation in everyday activities and social roles. Open-ended follow-up questions were also done to understand the nature of those items described as difficult. Thirty participants were interviewed.  Visual symptoms were significant for 96.7% of the participants. Quality of life scores for both physical and mental health were approximately one standard deviation below the US population norms. All categories except nutrition and personal cares were at least two standard deviations below the norms for community living adults. The everyday activities and social roles identified as very difficult for 80% or more of the participants were: recreation, education, work, house maintenance, and volunteering. Isolated tasks that were very difficult for 59% of more of participants included using a computer, communicating in a group, reading, and driving. It appears that the isolated tasks were perceived as less difficult than when put together. Narrative responses were grouped into three themes: challenges of the task and environment, self-identified personal difficulties, and changes to habits/priorities/roles. The complexity of the situation as well its dynamic nature is discussed. Recommendations are made for which activities and visual symptoms health professionals should be aware, as well as possible assessment tools to use.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to describe participation and quality of life for small sample of adults with ABI-related oculomotor impairments.
  • Participants will identify 4 common everyday activities and symptoms that are often difficult for persons with ABI-related oculomotor impairments.
  • Participants will identify two issues other than visual that are common for persons with ABI-related oculomotor impairments that add to the complexity of the situation.

Presenters:   Sharon Gowdy Wagener, OTD, OTR/L

 

  3I A Change in Perspective on how to Serve Individuals with ALS Through Occupation

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description: In the scope of neuromuscular diagnoses, ALS is not one that anyone would choose. ALS can rob someone of their occupation, functional mobility, speech, and ultimately their ability to breathe. Symptom onset and progression differs from person to person, but the outcome is always the same. Fortunately, local certified clinics and the ALS Association have made living with ALS more tolerable by offering training, education, resources and equipment to ensure safety and enhance function. 

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Gain a greater understanding of ALS, treatment, community support and resources

Presenters:   Kristin Wallock, MS, OTR/L; Sonya Tangen, OTR/L and Robin Samuel, OTR/L

 

  3J Testing your Knowledge: NBCOT Exam Preparation

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This MOTA session will consist of an interactive game-style presentation with information on registering, studying, and taking the NBCOT exam, as well as an opportunity to answer sample test questions. This session is open to both OTA and MOT students and/or professionals in academia and will last one hour. There will be panelists available to share their advice and knowledge and to sit in with groups during the game to provide further insight.  The topics addressed in this session include: NBCOT basics (registration, timeline, and fees), study materials available for students to utilize,  strategies that previous test takers have found helpful when studying, and how to plan testing date after finishing an OT program.  Attendees will have the opportunity to explore practice questions obtained from study materials through an interactive game. Students will have an opportunity to ask questions regarding the topics listed above.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Gain information about available study guides (online, books, flashcards, etc) to prepare for the NBCOT exam.
  • Learn about effective study strategies used by students who have taken the exam.
  • Acquire knowledge about the NBCOT registration process, including timelines and fees.
  • Put their occupational therapy knowledge to the test with a variety of sample questions taken from various study guides.

Presenters:   Sheila Bosc, OTS

Click here to register