Conference Session Details

Full Session Details

TRACKS:

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ACADEMICS MENTAL HEALTH PEDIATRICS PHYSICAL DISABILITIES

  

 

 

Saturday Keynote Address - 8:00AM - 9:00AM

  Keynote address Still Standing.  Still Smiling

 

Target Audience:  OT, OTA

Content Level:  Introductory/Intermediate

Keynote Description:  

LESSONS TO BE LEARNED LISTENING TO JOHN KRIESEL

Challenges...Everybody faces adversity--it doesn't matter the size or scope of your challenge, it is the attitude that you bring to the table that will help you overcome that adversity and it will make you a stronger person.

Acceptance ...You can't begin to resolve your challenge until you accept it. John lost his legs and two buddies in Iraq explosion.  Rather than wallow in self-pity, he resolved to live his life to the fullest and to make the best out of his second chance at life.

Plan ...Develop a plan to overcome your challenge, make it into an opportunity. When told he might not walk again and would be hospitalized two years, John doubled his physical therapy regimen, working himself to exhaustion. He walked out of Walter Reed Medical Center nine months later.

Humor …In his darkest moments, John found time to laugh. Always a lighthearted guy, he discovered laughter and not taking yourself too seriously are powerful medicine in any endeavor.

Support ...Nobody does it alone. Friends, family and people you don't know will help but you need to accept their help.  Success is a team sport. John’s army buddies in the eld, medical sta- in four hospitals, family, and scores of people, many he never met, got John up on his new feet.

Share ...Use your success to help others and you help yourself. The greater your success, the more you will enjoy sharing it by helping others beat their challenges, no matter how big or small those challenges may be.

Presenter:  John Kriesel, Motivational Speaker  

Saturday Selections by time

9:10AM - 11:10AM

  1A Expand Your Influence and Bring OT Beyond Traditional Settings

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Occupational therapist are well-positioned to add value to leadership/innovation/policy beyond traditional OT settings. This OT skills set includes starting your own business/practice, involvement in leadership roles, government, and board positions. Participants can expect to connect with other professionals and find resources relevant for their interests. Participants will leave with a changed mindset regarding personal/professional vision of OT in their existing setting, and beyond.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will list the AOTA Vision 2025 pillars
  • Participants will discuss ideas of how to expand their understanding of the breadth of options for OTs
  • Participants will apply new learning to expand personal/professional options to expand their own influence
  • Participants will compare strategies, techniques, practice ideas to expand their influence
  • Participants will collect at least three relevant resources that will support an expansion of their circle of influence as an occupational therapist

 Presenters: Sue Redepenning OTR/L,  ATP and Caroline Portoghese, OTR/L, ATP/SMS, MSCS, LNHA, MBA

  1B Sexuality for All Abilities

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  People with disabilities want friendships and relationships as much as anyone else. Unfortunately, there is a lack of appropriate education out there to support safe and healthy relationships. The rate of sexual assault is 7 times higher for individuals with disabilities than for those without. We can work together to lower that statistic by supporting the sexual health for this population through conversations, education, and awareness.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explore why people with disabilities are more vulnerable to assault.
  • Review the background on sexual education for people with disabilities.
  • Discuss potential sexual education strategies.
  • Learn how to recognize and respond to sensitive situations that may come up for our students (assault, abuse, etc.).
  • Learn how to respond to inappropriate sexual behaviors that may happen at school, on the bus, or in the community.

Presenters: Katie Thune, Teaching License and Special Education K-12

 

  1C Put the Fun Back in Fine Motor

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Participants would engage in an interactive learning environment with take home ideas to use for simple parent education, clinical signs of impairments, and fun/practical/low cost treatment ideas for 6 areas of fine motor skill development for the preschool-early elementary aged child. Content would be provided in a station style of learning, with participants moving between stations for fun, easy, and hands-on learning opportunities.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to: 

  • Learner will have understanding of performance skills/deficits needed for typically developing fine motor skills of preschool and early elementary years
  • Learner will be able to articulate appropriate assessment and clinical observation skills for early fine motor development.
  • Learn practical strategies for providing parent education and treatment activities in these early fine motor developmental skills

Presenters: Sara Rohde, OTR/L, BCP; Darla Johnson, OTR/L; Anna Tucker, OTR/L; Molly Barrett, OTR/L; Kelsey Smith, OTR/L, Lacey Olson, OTR/L

 

  1D The Role of Occupational Therapy in Treating Mild to Moderate TBI

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  We will explore OT’s role in treatment of mild to moderate Traumatic brain injury diagnoses including current research, treatment, and neuro visual rehabilitation techniques. An overview of how Hennepin Healthcare uses an interdisciplinary approach to working with mTBI will be presented including OT’s integral role within the system as support for the mTBI population. New research supporting OT’s treatment with mTBI from Hennepin Healthcare will be reviewed. Two of the OT’s working with Hennepin Healthcare’s Traumatic Brain Injury Center specializing in neuro vision rehabilitation will discuss the process of treatment, developmental optometrist referral and treatment ideas to help those with mTBI in a variety of settings.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to identify symptoms of mild to moderate TBI and use this to educate family
  • Understand the functional impact mTBI has on a person and use this to justify OT services
  • Learn treatment techniques to help patients with mTBI manage symptoms/functional deficits
  • Understand when to appropriately treat/refer patients to developmental optometry.
  • Learn treatment techniques to improve oculomotor and visual motor deficits related to mTBI to improve patient participation in ADLs/IADLs

Presenters: Nova McNally OTR/L, Nicole St. John OTR/L, Courtney Mitchell OTR/L

 

  1E CarFit: OTs Distinct Value Connecting Problem with Solutions: An opportunity for community outreach

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  CarFit education offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles "fit" them. At CarFit we share our Distinct Value by connecting problems with "solutions". NO experience in driving is needed. Older drivers are often the safest drivers, but more likely to be killed or seriously injured due to fragility of aging bodies. OTs in any practice context can enhance safety by addressing cognitive, visual & physical impairments that may impact driving. CarFit is one solution offering occupational therapy increased visibility through community outreach and partnerships. A proper fit in one's car can greatly increase not only the driver's safety but also the safety of others. This session will explore typical problems and detailed education on associated solutions useful both at CarFit & in clinical practice! Learn the roles, training, & formats including 1:1 CarFits, how CarFit may benefit you, your family and your community! Check it out at www.car-fit.org

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Learners will understand the CarFit program, structure and requirements.
  • Learners will understand the importance of connecting problems with solutions, expanding our role by addressing driving risk as an IADL.
  • Learners will become knowledgeable of typical problems facing the aging driver and the range of solutions from education, to low-tech gadgets to the specialized services offered through driving rehabilitation.

Presenter: Elin Schold Davis, OTR/L, CDRS, FAOTA

 

12:45PM - 1:45PM

Communications Speaker: Growth Mindset and Occupational Therapy

Target Audience:  OTRs, COTA, OTS, entry level through advanced practitioners

Content Level:  Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Explore how growth mindset impacts the occupation and professional growth of occupational therapy.  Topics will include: Identifying, developing and integrating growth mindset into your life and the profession of OT.  

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the meaning of growth mindset versus a fixed mindset.   
  • Discuss the importance of growth mindset in OT practice.
  • Discuss the practical application of growth mindset in life and occupational therapy from student experience to practitioner, and educator.

Presenter:  Andrea (Drea) Harrison MS, OTR/L

  

1:55PM - 2:55PM 

  2A Legislative Issues 2018

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This session seeks to inform members about proposed legislation at the state and national level. Legislative issues that could arise in the upcoming legislative session will be presented. Changes in federal statutes and rules will also be discussed. The session includes opportunities for questions and answers from the audience.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe legislative issues at the state and national level that could impact occupational therapy practitioners and students in Minnesota
  • Describe the importance of the role of MOTA members in influencing legislation.
  • Contribute ideas for the legislative agenda of MOTA.

Presenters: Karen Sames & Andrea Horvath, MAOT, OTR/L

 

  2B The Science of Habit: Embedding the Performance Patterns of Habit and Routine into OT Practice

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The performance patterns of habit and routine are within the domain of occupational therapy yet may not always be fully considered during intervention planning and post-discharge program creation. The power of performance patterns should not be overlooked, however, as research suggests that up to 50% of a person’s daily activities and occupations are influenced by habit. This presentation focuses on the current neuroscience of habit, the mechanisms of habit formation, and the history of habit and routine within occupational therapy. Participants will learn specific techniques to help clients form healthy habits and fit new behaviors into pre-existing habitual routines as well as consider how the structure of therapy can support desired change post-discharge.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review research related to the neuroscience of habit
  • Discuss the nature and persistence of habit formation
  • Apply habit science to occupational therapy practice to support healthy habit formation and post-discharge compliance

Presenter: Michael Jensen, Ed.D., OTR/L

 

  2C Basket Weaving to Social Media: The Changing Landscape of Mental Health Occupational Therapy

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This course will include a brief overview of the history of occupation in mental health with an emphasis on the peculiarities and reasonings behind what treatment modalities were used early in OT practice settings. In relating early occupational approaches to modern day problems, we will review current literature regarding strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to occupational therapy in mental health. This presentation will include content primarily directed at traditional mental health practice, but will relate to mental health practice broadly. With a limited number of traditionally mental health OTs, there is also a "paucity" of literature produced on behalf of the use of occupation in mental health settings. This presentation will finish with presenting learning communities, online platforms, and informal resources to maintain a peer-professional network as well as develop ideas to make treatment engaging, occupational, and evidence-based.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand why the early OT modalities such as basket weaving were essential to OT history
  • Examine current literature regarding the efficacy of OT in mental health practice settings
  • List current websites, resources, and online OT communities for mental health collaboration
  • Identify and discuss ways to promote mental health and share the story of OT through online platforms

Presenter:  Grant Davis Mitchell, MOT, OTR/L

 

  2D Integrated Pediatric Primary Care Teams: Model Conceptualization

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Within this session occupational therapy's role in pediatric primary care will be investigated. Four primary care providers allowed researchers to shadow their well-child visits using structured observations. Occupational therapists noted information discussed in the visit, areas of opportunity for discussion, and missed opportunities. Many occupations were discussed during well-child visits; yet play was rarely discussed despite being a primary occupation of children for increased quality of life (Dahan-Oliel, Shikako-Thomas, & Mejnemer, 2012). Also, performance patterns and their link to occupational performance and environmental and contextual factors impacting performance were rarely discussed. Key considerations for providing integrated pediatric primary care services, including delivery contexts, collaborating on interdisciplinary teams, and funding for services will be explored.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to: 

  • Define primary care services and settings in which occupational therapy could be provided.
  • Identify potential opportunities for occupational therapy practice within existing and emerging contexts for delivering pediatric primary care services.
  • Analyze key considerations for integrated pediatric primary care team models.

Presenters: Stephanie Lynn DeSam Lazaro, OTD, OTR/L and Bonnie Riley, OTD, OTR/L, Contributing Researcher/Author

 

  2E Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy Interventions for Children with Autism: Current Practices and Continuing Education in Minnesota

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The purpose of this project was to investigate the use of 12 non-evidence-based practices often used with children with ASD in MN and to determine needs for occupational therapy practice for children with ASD in Minnesota. This mixed-methods project utilized a website content analysis, survey, and focus group to address the research questions. The study aimed to address: (1) How do pediatric occupational therapy practitioners in Minnesota understand evidence-based practice and apply evidence-based practice principles in their work with children with ASD? (2) How are the twelve specified interventions being used currently in pediatric occupational therapy practice for children with ASD in Minnesota? and (3) What are the next steps for supporting pediatric occupational therapy practitioners in Minnesota in being evidence-based for working with children with ASD?

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate increased awareness of the use of non-evidenced-based practices within pediatric occupational therapy in Minnesota and their implications 
  • Articulate methods for finding and utilizing evidence-based information concerning pediatric occupational therapy practice
  • Discuss approaches for incorporating evidence-based resources into practice setting

Presenters: Bryden Giving, OTS

 

  2F Occupational Therapy All Day, Every day, in the Transitional Care setting, Long Term Care Setting, and Home Health

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   Occupational therapy typically treats patients from 30-60 minutes a day. What is happening the other 23 hours each day? Join us in an open discussion learning ways that meaningful occupations and client centered goals facilitate active participation throughout the entire day.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participant will learn ways to facilitate meaningful occupations and active participation throughout the day in a Transitional Care setting
  • Participant will learn ways to facilitate meaningful occupations and active participation throughout the day in a Long Term Care setting
  • Participant will learn ways to facilitate meaningful occupations and active participation throughout the day in the Home setting
  • Patient will learn ways to overcome barriers in each setting

Presenters: Pamela Brooks, OTR/L

 

  2G Axillary Web Syndrome/Cording

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This presentation will describe the current incidence of Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS). It will explain the cause of AWS. Current ideas on its pathophysiology will be discussed in regards to research. The treatment of AWS in regards to occupational therapy will be instructed.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • The participant will be able to state the incidence of AWS
  • The participant will be able to describe the current research on AWS
  • The participant will understand current treatment in occupational therapy in regards to AWS.

Presenters: Carrie Macosky, OTR/L, CLT

 

3:00PM - 5:00PM

  3A Evidence Based Practice for the Clinician

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   In the climate of healthcare today, there is a need for clinicians understand and use evidence to promote occupational therapy’s role, scope and value in a variety of settings. Specifically, the clinician should be able to to identify clinical questions/problems, seek out knowledge, collect data and apply outcomes to practice to optimize patient care. This purpose of this short course highlight the importance of evidence based practice and provide clinicians and students with a foundation for how to use, conduct, and submit clinical content.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will identify the importance of evidenced based practice in the promotion of occupational therapy.
  • Participants will identify ways to be an active participant in clinical research or practice improvement projects.
  • Participants will recognize the steps in the submission pathway to publication and identify places to submit content.
  • Participants will identify a potential clinical problem that could be examined through a quality improvement or research project.

Presenters:   Jennifer Bergstrom OTR/L and Hannah Oldenburg, OTR/L 

 

  3B From Masters to OT Clinical Doctorate: What are the Major Differences? Panel Discussion

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The shift to the entry-level doctorate from the master’s degree requires more than just additional coursework for students. This panel discussion will explore the differences between doctoral and master’s entry-level education, especially as it relates to the doctoral capstone experience and project. An overview of potential structures for the doctoral capstone experience and correlating doctoral capstone projects will be provided. Opportunities for collaboration and partnership associated with the doctoral capstone will be explored. Through examples provided from local OT educational programs, you will have an opportunity to explore opportunities that may be available to you and your practice site when partnering with a doctoral student for their capstone experience in your practice setting.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will explore differences in master’s and doctoral entry-level education through examples provided from local OT programs.
  • Participants will become familiar with potential formats for implementation of the doctoral experiential component (DEC) across OT programs.
  • Participants will identify ways in which partnership with OT programs and doctoral students for the capstone experience can support their practice setting.

Presenters: Terrianne Jones, PhD, OTR/L and Cherie Graves, MOT, OTR/L

 

  3C OT Role in the Treatment of Hoarding Disorders

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   Learn about the role of occupational therapy in the treatment of hoarding disorder. Discover resources to support improvement in ADL and IADL safety and self management. This presentation offers both a first person account of the disorder as well as a therapists and group facilitators perspective on this complex condition.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the diagnosis of hoarding disorder, co-morbid conditions and contributing factors.
  • Identify tools and resources to assess and measure improvement in the treatment of hoarding disorder
  • Understand a first person perspective of hoarding disorder
  • Description and design of Buried in Treasures Workshops created by Shuer and Frost.

Presenters:   Jennifer LeClaire, OTR/L and Jean Rollin, MDiv

 

  3D Self-Regulation: The Key to Managing Behavior in Children with ASD, ADHD, Mood Disorders and other Mental Health Conditions

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  About 9.4% of children have a diagnosis of ADHD, while 1:59 have Autism(CDC, 2018). One in 5 children are thought to suffer from a mental health or learning disorder, with 80% of chronic mental health issues beginning in childhood (Child Mind Institute, 2015). There is a known link to these diagnoses and sensory processing disorders (SPD). SPD is also well linked to maladaptive behaviors in children (Dean et al., 2018). Dean et al., (2018) and Bailer and Miller (2011) suggest that sensory processing may be looked at as issues of sensory thresholds that then require self-regulation for behavior control. Further literature review suggests a link between self-regulation and executive function (Hofmann, Schmeichel, & Baddeley, 2012; Wells et al., 2012). The purpose of this workshop is to discuss research supporting self-regulation and its positive impact on child occupation and function.

 Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • By the end of the workshop, the learner will be able to: 1. Define self-regulation and generalize its assessment and treatment in children’s occupations.
  • Differentiate sensory processing, self-regulation, metacognition, self-regulated learning, and executive function.
  • Critically analyze evidence-based interventions for behavioral management in children with ASD, ADHD, mood disorders, and other mental health issues.
  • Apply methods of intervention association with self-regulation to current practice.

Presenters: Leann Shore, OTD, MEd, OTR/L

 

  3E Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) 2018 Revised Manual and Practice Model

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The Cognitive Performance Test (CPT) is a standardized assessment offering both clinical utility and ecological validity for predicting levels of competency required in every-day tasks. Ecological validity refers to whether the findings in a controlled environment can be generalized to the real world. The goal of OT evaluation is predictive validity for real-world functioning with an emphasis on measuring change. Despite its wide use, too often scholars and clinicians misuse the CPT through use of old versions, personal adaptations, using too few subtasks, or use of the CPT as an ADL assessment versus CPT's intended analysis of functional cognition with predictive application for IADL. This course presents the CPT 2018 Manual and Practice Model. Each subtask is discussed, including task analysis, task set-up, and administration procedure. Participants will receive the CPT 2018 Manual, practice subtasks, and discuss evaluation in their clinics with respect to diagnosis and prognosis.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the neurocognitive base of the CPT as a working memory and executive function measure
  • Discuss DSM 5 cognitive and functional criteria for mild vs. major neurocognitive disorders
  • Review the CPT 2018 Revised Manual and administration protocols for each subtask
  • Discuss CPT Profile interventions for IADL, ADL, independent living and safety
  • Present outcome studies that support the CPT for functional diagnosis and intervention

Presenters: Theressa Burns, OTR/L

 

  3F Persistent Pain: Knowledge and Tools for OTs Treating Patients with Pain

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  More than 100 million Americans, approximately 1/4 experience chronic pain. Despite staggering increases in medications and invasive surgical procedures this is not improving. We have a pain problem. Chronic pain is complex and involves more than just body tissues and nerves. Assessment and treatment of pain must take into account the various bio-psycho-social factors at play in order to maximize efficacy. The holistic and functionally focused framework OT is built on makes us primed to be part of the solution. This presentation is designed to provide background knowledge as well as practical take home tools that can be implemented into clinical work to improve effectiveness with treating pain- both assisting those who have been dealing with pain for a long time and more effectively treating acute pain to reduce likelihood of chronicity.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how language commonly used in healthcare settings can either positively or negatively impact patients with pain and ways in which focused education can assist in treatment efforts.
  • Demonstrate an increased understanding of the most recent evidence in the neuroscience of pain via the ability to correctly complete the Pain Neurophysiology Questionnaire.
  • Identify at least 3 metaphors to be utilized to explain pain neuroscience concepts to clients.
  • Verbalize at least 5 evidence based non-pharmacologic treatment options/strategies and their use in relation to the pain neuroscience concepts discussed.

Presenters: Lindsay Marth, MA, OTR/L, BCPR, TPS

  

Sunday Sessions by time

9:10AM - 11:10AM

  4A Changing Expectations for Experiential Learning in OT Education: Implications for Level I Fieldwork and practice/education 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Increased demand for fieldwork placement, opportunities for community engagement, and technology updates have stimulated new models for experiential learning in occupational therapy education. With the change are new opportunities for partnership to strengthen occupation-based education; are you ready to use them? In this session you will learn about experiential education, the impetus for the change and the various forms of level I fieldwork being proposed with the new accreditation standards. Examples of and reasoning for development of various formats will be shared by local academic programs. Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the “fit” of formats discussed to their own practice setting and identify opportunities for collaboration with local programs. Finally, audience participants and educators will consider together how experiential learning, including Level I and II Fieldwork, might be optimally sequenced to support student learning of occupation-based practice.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will become familiar with terminology and reasoning surrounding changes in experiential education in occupational therapy.
  • Participants will recognize differences between various forms of level I fieldwork introduced with recent change in accreditation standards (including simulation, faculty led practice, etc).
  • Participants will evaluate the “fit” of various level I fieldwork formats to their own practice setting and identify opportunities for collaboration with local programs.

Presenters: Debra Hanson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; R. Michelle Warfel, MOT, OTR/L, AFWC; Terrianne Jones, PhD, OTR/L; John Fleming, EdD, OTR/L, AFWC; Allison Naber, OTD, OTR/L, CLT-LANA

 

  4B Blue Sky Café: Serving Up Fun Opportunities for Social Engagement in a Safe and Welcoming Atmosphere

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Remarkable changes can occur when people sit down together to have a cup of coffee, talk things over and play a game . The Blue Sky Café, initially created and led by Peg Garding, OTR, for Regions’ inpatients on NE4 (the mental health ICU), has become a mainstay of NE4 programming. Once a week, patients, nurses, psychiatrists, mental health associates, and occupational therapists come together to share food, laughter, and hot drinks. How did the Blue Sky Cafe begin, what makes this beautifully occupation-based intervention work so well, and how might you implement a version of the Blue Sky Café in your practice setting… these are questions we will explore together, while sharing a cup of coffee (and maybe a brownie).

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants can expect to: Learn about the history of the Blue Sky Café, an occupation-based intervention designed for persons with serious mental illness then adapted for less acute mental health units and a school setting
  • Gain an understanding of how engagement in the Blue Sky Café can facilitate improved comfort in social settings, leading to increased participation in the occupations of social engagement and leisure participation
  • Identify needed materials, pre-planning measures, and ongoing “things to pay attention to” to successfully implement a version of the Blue Sky Café in participants’ own practice setting

Presenters: Megan K Flood, OTR/L; Mary Beth Severson, COTA; Nicole Arnhold OTR/L

  

  4C Yoga Through the Eyes of a Pediatric OT

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This workshop will enable OTs working with children to deepen their understanding on how mind-body work can impact self regulation when working with clients who have sensory processing deficits and/or trauma. Discussion of the neuroscience and stress response will be explored to inform participants on the power of the brain-body connections. During this workshop participants will experience hands-on learning, practice calming strategies, simple yoga movements, relaxation techniques and social/emotional skill development activities to incorporate into their OT treatment plan.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the impact mind-body work can have during treatment sessions with clients who have had adverse experiences.
  • Practice strategies to increase body awareness, increase regulation/calming strategies, and promote overall self confidence.
  • Recognize signs of trauma (dissociation and emotional triggers) and how to intervene effectively using a mind-body approach.
  • Recognize the connection between trauma, sensory, and primitive reflexes and how they impact participation in daily life.

Presenters:   Katie Novak, OTR/L and Johanna McGough-Pose MAOT, OTR/L

 

  4D I Survived Critical Illness-Now What? Patient Perspective of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   As a follow-up to last year's presentation, we will delve into the patient experience of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS), a long-lasting and complex issue impacting physical, cognitive, and/or psychological function. Centered around footage of interviews with ICU survivors, we will provide real examples of what PICS looks like. We will review current literature as well as health-system movements to improve recognition, education, and treatment of PICS.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will be able to list and describe at least four ways PICS may manifest in survivors and family members.
  • Participants will be able to list and describe how PICS may impact normal daily functioning.
  • Participants will feel confident in providing basic patient/family education on PICS.

Presenters:   Emily Bodensteiner Schmitt, MOT, OTR/L and Kristin Hall, MS, OTR/L, MBA

 

  4E The Right Stuff: RIGHT Care for the RIGHT patient at the RIGHT Time

 Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This course is designed to encourage clinicians to take a critical look at how therapy services are delivered in an inpatient acute care setting. The current health care environment requires that we provide optimal patient care while also promoting financial sustainability. With ever increasing demands on the clinician, the traditional approach to providing services to all referred patients is no longer effective. The principles and tools presented in this course will empower the clinician to think critically about providing the right care to the right patient at the right time. Course material and discussion will be presented with an interdisciplinary rehab team focus.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to define utilization of therapy services in the inpatient setting.
  • Describe the utilization principles used by OT/PT/SLP at UMMC-Fairview to provide the right care for the right patient at the right time.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the risks and benefits of implementing proper utilization practices to an inpatient rehabilitation department

Presenters:   Alli Gerlach, OTR/L; Danielle Schneeman, MS CCC-SLP; Wayne Zerr, OTR/L; Kim Lambert, DPT

 

  4F Eye Tracking Made Easy

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   This presentation will review the technical and functional aspects of eye tracking technology and how it has changed to become more user friendly and accessible. With Microsoft Windows 10 adding Eye Control to its accessibly options eye gaze technology is going main stream. Eye gaze solutions for those with significant physical challenges will be identified. Explore various tools (hardware and software options) that support the eye gaze access method for those with emergent to independent computer, learning and communication skills.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review and identify the basics of eye gaze technology
  • Describe two methods for customizing access for those with emergent skills.
  • Describe two methods for customizing access for those with independent skills
  • Identify three key technical features that make eye tracking technology successful.

Presenters:   Daniel Friel, Northeastern MN Solutions Consultant at Tobii Dynavox and Katie Champ, Tobii Dynavox Solutions Consultant

 

11:20AM - 12:20PM

  5A   The Role of the “See Me As A Person” Curriculum in Fostering Relationship-Based Care Culture in Organizations

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  This presentation will discuss the importance of therapeutic use of self and will present research findings on the impact of the See Me as a Person (SMAAP) curriculum from the facilitators’ perspectives. Therapeutic use of self (TUS) and client-centered practice have long been a part of occupational therapy (OT). The SMAAP curriculum was developed based on the Relationship-Based Care model (RBC) to help foster a relationship-based care culture in organizations. A phenomenological study was conducted to determine facilitator perspectives on the impact of the SMAAP curriculum. Findings support previous research that indicates the SMAAP curriculum is a valuable tool that can be used to help healthcare professionals re-awaken caring behaviors in practice. Participants in this session will be introduced to the basic tenets of therapeutic use of self (TUC), client-centered and relationship based care, the foundations of the SMAAP curriculum, and the supporting research.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of client-centered care, therapeutic use of self, and relationship-based care in OT practice.
  • Learn the foundational principles of the See Me as a Person (SMAAP) curriculum.
  • Discuss general principles learned in supporting research related to relationship based care.
  • Discuss practical ways to apply principles learned into one’s own practice.

Presenters: Alexandra Hein, OTS and Kristine Haertl, Ph.D., ACE, OTR/L, FAOTA

 

  5B Licensure in Minnesota: MN Board of Occupational Therapy Practice and MOTA

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Regulation of Occupational Therapy Practice in the State of Minnesota began its transition from the Minnesota Department of Health to the Minnesota Board of Occupational Therapy Practice January, 2018. Full responsibility for occupational therapy transferred to the Board April 19, 2018. Learn how and why this happened. Learn what this means for citizens of the State of Minnesota and for you as a practitioner. Learn more about the difference between the Minnesota Board of Occupational Therapy Practice, your licensing board and the Minnesota Occupational Therapy Association, your practitioner association.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the history of occupational therapy licensing in Minnesota
  • Understand the motivation for the transition of licensing to an independent licensing board
  • Understand MOTA's role in the transition
  • The differing roles of the MBOTP and MOTA
  • What MBOTP can and cannot do and the MBOTP going forward

Presenter: Christina Bourland OTR/L and Karen Sames, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA

 

  5C Chronic Pain and Pain Management Strategies for Adults

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  Living with chronic pain (CP) is a reality for many adults and has a strong correlation with mental health issues. According to the AOTA Practice Framework, it is within the scope of occupational therapy to provide interventions that take a non-pharmacological approach to reducing the physiological and psychological effects of chronic pain. Although chronic pain cannot be eliminated, specific interventions have been shown to effectively reduce chronic pain, its associated psychological malaise, and improve functional participation in daily occupations. This presentation is a summary of interventions found in current research to support the reduction of chronic pain in adults

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Participants will gain an understanding of the primary psycho-social factors frequently associated with chronic pain as supported by current research
  • Participants will learn about the components of successful intervention strategies for adults living with chronic pain from our literature review
  • Participants will receive a resource list of current articles and intervention strategies regarding the topic of chronic pain management for adults

Presenters: Ruth Chase, OTS Shanna Graden, OTS Susie Johnson, OTS Abigail Jovanovich, OTS Heather Murphy, OTS Jenna Noonan, OTS Hannah Oldenburg, M.A., OTR/L

 

  5D Facilitating a Community-Based Peer-Mentoring Program for Psychosocial Support of Breast Cancer Patients: A Unique Role for Occupational Therapy

Target Audience:  OT, OTA

Content Level:  Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  AOTA identifies oncology as an emerging practice area in occupational therapy. Despite our profession’s holistic approach, current oncology practice primarily treats physical deficits experienced by cancer patients. Progress has been made in recognizing OT’s role in addressing cognitive deficits and lymphedema. However, the psychosocial effects of cancer remain under-addressed. This area of supportive oncology care provides opportunity for our profession to grow. We will discuss OT’s distinct value in addressing psychosocial needs of breast cancer patients and survivors through exploration of a community-based program for breast cancer patients and survivors. By examining a unique niche in our profession, attendees will challenge their assumptions regarding the methods by which OTs can meet the needs of oncology patients. The discussion will emphasize the importance of demonstrating OT’s distinct value in oncology care to further validate and expand our role on the treatment team.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the psychosocial needs of breast cancer patients and survivors.
  • Describe occupational therapy’s distinct value in providing supportive care and psychosocial support for breast cancer patients and survivors.
  • Using a case example, explore the use of occupational therapy’s unique perspective in development and implementation of a community-based peer-mentoring program for breast cancer patients and survivors.

Presenter(s): Jenny Cook, BSW, MA, OTR/L

 

  5E Implications of EIDBI for Occupational Therapy and Children with ASD 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The Early Intensive Developmental and Behavioral Intervention (EIDBI) Benefit is a Minnesota health care program that serves persons under the age of twenty-one who are on Medical Assistance and have a diagnosis of ASD or a related condition. EIDBI covers up to 40 hours of treatment a week for children with ASD, and the primary treatment methods are within the scope of occupational therapy practice. OTs are unable to become a primary provider of EIDBI services since OTs are not licensed to diagnose. With the current EIDBI provider shortage, a solution is to advocate at the state level for occupational therapists to repeal the need to diagnose ASD to become a primary provider of EIDBI services."

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the Early Intervention Developmental and Behavioral Intervention (EIDBI) Benefit
  • Demonstrate an increased awareness of the current EIDBI provider shortage and the implications for children with ASD in rural areas of Minnesota
  • Articulate methods for how occupational therapy practitioners can advocate to become a CMDE and QSP provider on the state level

Presenters: Bryden Giving, OTS &Theresa Bentz MA, OTR/L

 

  5F Low Back Pain in Pregnancy 

Target Audience: OT, OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:   The aim of this course is to present a current review of the literature concerning pregnancy related LBP. Topics to include prevalence, prevention, prognosis, precautions and etiology regarding LBP in pregnancy. Evidence-based treatment techniques focus on exercise and patient education. Exercises will include pregnancy stretches, cardiovascular exercise, core training and exercise precautions. Patient education will include proper body mechanics with childcare, and postural training.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • To learn etiology of LBP in pregnancy
  • To learn the role of evidence-based treatment principles that you can apply in your practice
  • To learn the muscles of your core and how to engage them
  • To learn prenatal exercise precautions

Presenters:  Christy Dauner, OTR/L

  

  5G An Occupational Therapy Residency for Specialty Practice in Dysphagia 

Target Audience:  OT/OTA

Content Level: Introductory/Intermediate

Course Description:  The emerging practice of Dysphagia is not only within the Occupational Therapy scope of practice, but a crucial factor in patient well-being.  OTs at Mayo Clinic have incorporated dysphagia into standard practice for many years, and have now created a residency program to train practitioners in dysphagia assessment, treatment, research, and staff training. A cohort of two OTRs began the one-year residency in March of 2018 to train as providers of clinical dysphagia services.  The Mayo Clinic Dysphagia Residency is a strong model for training general OTs to integrate dysphagia into the standard OT process.  This residency interacts closely with interdisciplinary teams to improve patient functional outcomes and minimize complications through all phases of acuity.  The residency curriculum incorporates patient treatment, didactic training, research projects, education material review, and training of other OT staff to improve dysphagia practice and overall patient care at Mayo Clinic.

Learning Objectives:  Following completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the contributions of a dysphagia residency program to OT practice and patient outcomes.
  • Recognize common dysphagia assessments and treatments used for patient care including training required for competency.
  • Identify areas of dysphagia-related research which can contribute to patient outcomes in various levels of acuity.
  • Recognize next steps for occupational therapy advanced practice in dysphagia.

Presenters: Anne Maureen Lexen, MA, OTR/L;Janelle Hatlevig, MA, OTR/L, BCPR; Claire Perry, MA, OTR/L

 

 

This course is eligible for American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Approved Provider credit. The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products or clinical procedures by AOTA.

AOTA Classification Codes: Domain of OT, Occupational Therapy Process, Professional Issues.

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